Young generation and US agriculture

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The food we eat, the clothes we wear, and the fuel that powers our lives are produced with agriculture. The long run of agriculture is reliant on the subsequent generation of innovators, communicators, producers, educators, and leaders. 

Who is that the new farmer?

New growers and farmers will be young or old, inquisitive about emerging agricultural technology or developing things. A number of new farmers are youth who are developing their responsibilities within the privately held corporation but many are from non-farming backgrounds, they are learning the new world. There are new farmers everywhere. 

Did you recognize that but 10 percent of yank farmers are under the age of 35? America needs younger farm operatives but they need help. So, why they need more young farmers? The reason why young farmers need is that they bring about a brand new perspective on agriculture. 

For the U.S. agriculture industry to achieve providing reliable food for its growing population, it must adopt more sustainable, efficient, and environmentally friendly farming practices. Millennial farmers are during a better position to implement green farming technology than their predecessors. The average American farmer is 58 years old, which suggests that an oversized number of them will retire within the next few years.

 At present, there aren’t enough young farmers to induce slowdown. Without the arrival of recent agricultural workers, American consumers will rely more on imported food than ever before. If so, how can we attract the young generation to agriculture? 

United States department of agriculture (USDA) is doing an excellent job for that. 

  1. Put agriculture on the school curriculum

Elementary and high school education may include modules on farming. This will help teens to work out agriculture as a possible profession. 

The USDA NIFA Introduced a program called Agriculture in Classroom Program (AITC), which help to boost pre-K agricultural literacy, awareness, knowledge, and value among 12th-grade teachers and their students. Through workshops, seminars, field trips, farm trips, and other activities, AITC serves nearly 5 million students and 60,000 teachers annually. 

2. Scholarships 

Relatively few students favor studying agriculture, perhaps because the standard of agricultural training is mixed. Specializing in agribusiness and entrepreneurship, he taught that there should be more relevant to the advancement of fabric technology, facilitation of innovation, and greater relevance to a various and evolving agricultural sector. Beyond technical skills, the powers to manage, make decisions, communicate, and build leadership should even be central to instruction. Reforms in agricultural tertiary education have to be designed for youth which process requires their direct involvement. 

The USDA / 1890 National Scholarship Program could be a partnership between USDA and 1890 historically black land awarding colleges and universities. The program provides complete tuition, fees, books, rooms, and boarding for college kids pursuing degrees in agriculture, food, natural resources, or related disciplines. Once the scholar has completed the scholarship and summer work requirements of the scholarship, the USDA may, at its discretion, transform the coed into a permanent employee without further competition. 

3. Link social media to agriculture 

The rise of social media (Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp, etc.) and therefore the attraction among children with access to appropriate technologies may be a path towards agriculture. Portable use in Africa is growing rapidly and other people are now interacting with information sources. Utilizing these channels to push agriculture and educate the youth can go an extended way in connecting new people to the sector. 

4. Improve agriculture image 

Farming is not portrayed within the media as a teenager’s sport, it is seen as outdated, unprofitable, and toil. A greater understanding of the advantages of agriculture as a profession should be built among the youth. Media, information, and communication technology and social media can use to attain a far better agricultural image for a wider audience and to share information and experiences between youth and young farmers. 

ICT can use to teach and train those that are unable to attend teaching institutions, but it also can be used as a tool to assist youth to expand their knowledge, build networks, and find jobs. Technology solutions are needed to feed a technologically intelligent generation. Such technologies can reduce the price of business transactions and increase the profitability of agriculture. 

Young people might even see agriculture as a sector much neglected by the govt., giving farming the image of being quaint. Investment in agriculture is simpler at reducing poverty than investment in the other sector. As a government, as a rustic, those that love agriculture: we’ve got the responsibility to show our young generation about agriculture. If not, we’ll be able to depend upon other countries.

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