Why is U.S. life expectancy declining

Share This

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on email

The average life expectancy in the U.S. has been on the drop for three continuous years. A baby born in 2017 is expected to survive to be 78.6 years old, that’ is down from 78.7 the year before. A baby born in 2017 is expected to survive to be 78.6 years old, that’s down from 78.7 the year before. That means in just a year, the ordinary American’s life expectancy has been shortened by 1.2 months. The last three years express the longest consecutive drop in the American lifespan at birth since the period between 1915 and 1918, a period that combined World War I and the Spanish Flu pandemic, and events that killed millions globally. Before the recent drop, life expectancy was firmly rising in the U.S., which is to be expected of an upper-level nation, especially one that spends more money per citizen on healthcare than any other country. 

This decline is no unique to the United States.  One new study projected the U.K. lifespan will decrease by about five months. And while life expectancy is yet on the rise in France, Germany, Sweden, and the Netherlands, these countries have also seen a visible slowdown. Historically, life expectancy in the U.S. was on a level with other OECD countries, but in the last years, that’s changed, with the OECD average stretching ahead of the U.S. in life expectancy. 

Life expectancy also varies by sex. Men can expect to survive 76.1 years at birth, while women in the U.S. are expected to survive 81.1 years. Even though there is no clear evidence of a reason for this steady decline other than recent pandemics, a record by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, highlights three things contributing to the drop. The first- drug overdoses. In 2017, more than 70,000 deaths happened because of a drug overdose. Of these, opioids were associated with over 47,000. The second factor is liver disease. Over 10 years, the mortality rate for chronic liver illness and cirrhosis among men aged 25 to 34 grown by nearly 8% per year. For women in the same age group, the raise averaged more than 11% per year. The causes of the liver condition can vary, from genetics to alcohol misuse and obesity. The third factor recognized by the CDC is a rise in suicide rates. The national suicide rate has grown by 33% since 1999, and in 2017 alone, they went up by 3.7%. The country’s most rural regions have suicide rates nearly twice as many as those in urban communities. 

Several statistical studies have revealed that in general, individuals born in wealthier countries can expect to live extend than those born in poorer countries. 

 A poverty decline implies better access to food, housing, education, and health services, things that help extend your life. However, the connection between income and life expectancy reduces once it hits a specific level. The U.S., the world’s biggest economy, is one of the most distinguished exceptions to the income-life association. After several years of small declines, it’s hard to know whether the U.S. life expectancy will fall any further or flatten, but there’s one thing that’s for sure public health authorities are alarmed.

Share This

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on email

You May Also Like

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *