Divinely Blessed Emperor of China Seeks Immortality

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We met the first emperor of China was Qin Shi Huang previously, and there he was lucky enough in the first chapter of life. Unfortunately, the time has arrived for his misfortune in the second half. Pieces of evidence prove that he was increasingly lonely because of fear of life. He destroyed his own life in search of immortality.

The Great Wall of China

Immediately after the unification of China, the Great Wall’s construction was the first major project undertaken by Emperor. The northern part of China was frequently attacked by warlike tribes lived beyond it. As a defensive tactic against this, walls were erected by various border states. But it was not a constant barrier connecting the northern border. That is what the Qin emperor wanted. He connected the existing walls and forts, strengthened them, and built a long wall. It is said that this was ten meters high.

As the war drew to a close, large numbers of recruits were expelled. Many people could be used for this, including slaves and prisoners. Despite the sun and rain, tens of thousands of people worked hard to build wall. It is said that many died there, and their bodies were also buried under the wall.

Many parts of the Great Wall, built by the Emperor, are no longer visible. It was later renovated and extended.

Preparing for Death

Emperor Qin feared death even before he became Emperor. This was especially the case with the conspiracies and assassination attempts he faced. He was further frightened by the thought that he would torment the souls of those he had killed in the world of the dead.

Emperor Qin decided to take an army of soldiers to his defense in the world of the dead. Earlier, too, Chinese rulers buried small terracotta soldiers in their tombs. But the Qin emperor wanted an army slightly more extensive than his living size.

That is how the terracotta soldiers in present-day Shaanxi were created. It has about 8000 terracotta soldiers and officers, as well as chariots and horses. These soldiers, horses, and chariots are meticulously crafted and have armor that soldiers carry.

Until 1974, there were only legendary and literary evidence of a tomb complex, including the tomb of Emperor Qin and other structures. In 1974, a group of Chinese farmers met with terracotta soldiers, convincing them that these historical records were correct.

The Tomb

According to these historical facts, the tomb of the Emperor was made of gold. The floor of the large hall in the middle of it was a map of China. Mercury was used for rivers. Although China has large mercury deposits, extracting only the amount of mercury used for this tomb could have taken considerable time and effort. Besides, the ceiling of the tomb was inlaid with gemstones to symbolize the stars in the sky.

X-rays revealed that the Emperor’s tomb was buried under a mound of earth near where the terracotta soldiers were found. Tests performed here revealed a large concentration of mercury in the soil samples associated with a center chamber. It is thought that the mercury vapor was deposited on the topsoil.

Towards Death in Search of Immortality

Initially preparing for death, the Emperor turned his attention to the other side, where even armies were stationed to protect him from the dead. That is, to find a cure for immortality. He became an emperor by divine grace and began to believe that he could attain immortality.

His doctors prescribed various medications. One is sexual intercourse. It was believed that having more sexual intercourse with different women would increase life expectancy. At the same time, his chemists had to give the Emperor a pill containing mercury. Mercury is the only substance that can dissolve gold. Hence it was believed to have great power. It was also believed to have the potential to increase life expectancy in particular. But mercury did the other thing. It is a heavy metal and affects the nervous system and brain. Excessive intake of mercury can lead to dementia. That is what happened to the Emperor at the end of time.

In 210 BC, the Emperor died on his way back from a voyage to the coast. The deceased Emperor was buried in his tomb. His women were also detained to go with him to the next world. The body was handed over for burial to a group of people, including its creators, who knew the tomb’s routes. They buried the Emperor’s body there and closed the main entrance to the tomb before coming out.

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